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Journal Abstracts

Research Related to Psychology and Zen

* Please take note that different journals have varying levels of stringency when considering articles for publication.
These abstracts are listed to help visitors find information that will lead to closer inspection of the studies before any convictions are made.


East-West Issues in Psychology

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TITLE: Silenzio e meditazione: una via di transformazione. /Silence and meditation: A way to transformation.

ABSTRACT: Explores the way of silence and meditation as the human path to tr anscendence and transformation and a way of attaining universal consciousness through liberation from the shackles of the individual self. The ways of meditation are many, although they all start from a selfinduced state of open, expectant relaxation simi lar to M. Heidegger's "Gelassenheit." Meditation modes addressed include Zen, Taoism (Lao Tzu's"negative way"), and Kundalini Yoga. Today's meditators are motivated, among other incentives, by the need for regaining something that belongs to humankind, but had been seemingly lost, i.e., silence as a necessary return to the core of their being. Meditation, as a psychic experience, is universal, but the modality chosen for it is an individual choice. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Cortese, Mariella
AFFILIATION:
PUBLICATION: Giornale Storico di Psicologia Dinamica
ISSUE: 1998 Jan Vol 22(43) 89-103.

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TITLE: The interface between rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) and Zen.

ABSTRACT: While rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) highlights the norm of people's dogmatic, fanatical, and rigid religious beliefs, it has always favoured several aspects of Zen-Buddhism as a modus vivendi. Scientifically-based REBT and wisdom-oriented Zen have more in common than one might think at first sight. The authors show how REBT and Zen have significant commonalities as well as differences. It is submitted that most of REBT theory and practice are in keeping with the spirit of Z en. The authors note that East and West may in some ways cross-fertilize each other in the interface between these 2 proposed ways of living. The narrative techniques of Zen by means of koans (e.g., analogies, metaphors, parables) and of REBT (its cogniti ve, emotional, and behavioral methods derived from its phenomenological view of human neurosis) are somewhat complimentary to each other. The authors suggest that REBT had better be integrated with the most useful of other therapies, including Zen, so tha t it becomes and remains effective with many people much of the time. The practice of REBT fits with (post)modern Zen as an open living system. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Kwee, Maurits; Ellis, Albert
AFFILIATIO N:
PUBLICATION: Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive Behavior Therapy
ISSUE: 1998 Spr Vol 16(1) 5-43.

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TITLE: The altered state: A missing link in ego state theory?

ABSTRACT: The authors suggest that an altered state of consciousness is a form of a functional ego state and encourage further study into its function and meaning with regard to transactional analysis. The altered state of consciousness has been given many names: trance state, meditative state, enlightened state, and alpha state among them. This particular form of altered state appears to be a part of the Natural Child ego state. It is entirely possible that this part of the Natural Child is a kind of "return" to a state of consciousness experienced very early in life. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Avary, Bob; Millhollon, Bill
AFFILIATION: Private Practice, Midland, TX, USA
PUBLICATION: Transactional Analysis Journal
ISSUE: 1997 Oct V ol 27(4) 295-297.

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TITLE: Being present: Experiential connections between Zen Buddhist practices and the grieving process.

ABSTRACT: Explores the experiential connections between various aspects of Zen Buddhist practic e, the experience of loss, and supporting someone through the grieving process. The material for this paper was drawn from interactions with clients of a grief support service which took place over a 3-mo period. The personal encounters on which the paper is based include several with Ss who had a disability. Five encounters with bereaved Ss are presented, and the experiential episodes are described. Several points of connection were identified. These included a heightened awareness of the embodied nature of experience, the importance of dialog and relationship for both healing and transformation, the focus on process as opposed to outcome, the importance of the process of life review, a confrontation with the nature of absence and emptiness, and being present to what is experienced rather than focusing on the need for change. Findings are discussed in terms of K. Wilber's (1986) full-spectrum model of human development. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Edwards, Mark
AFFILIATION: U Western Australia, U Support Ctr, WAU, Australia
PUBLICATION: Disability & Rehabilitation: An International Multidisciplinary Journal
ISSUE: 1997 Oct Vol 19(10) 442-451.

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TITLE: Changes in self-concept, ego defense mechanisms, and religiosity following seven-day Vipassana meditation retreats.

ABSTRACT: To enhance psychological adjustment, Vipassana meditation assists individuals to perceive the transitory nature of the self. Because the con sequences of this potentially troubling insight are not well understood, changes in self-concept and ego defense mechanisms of 438 young (mean age 18 yrs) Thai Ss who attended 7 day Vipassana meditation retreats and a nontreated control group of 281 Ss we re compared. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed positive gains in all areas of self-representation among meditators relative to controls (p < .001). Ego defense mechanisms of the meditation participants also underwent significant change (p < .0001) with coping becoming characterized by greater maturity and tolerance of common stressors. Increases in Buddhist beliefs were significantly correlated with heightened self-esteem and less impulsiveness (ps < .001). Theoretical and applied implications of the findings are discussed. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Emavardhana, Tipawadee; Tori, Christopher D.
AFFILIATION: Thammasat U, Counseling Psychology Program, Bangkok, Thailand
PUBLICATION: Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
ISSUE: 1997 Jun Vol 36(2) 194-206.

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TITLE: On the stages of perception: Towards a synthesis of cognitive neuroscience and the Buddhist Abhidhamma tradition.

ABSTRACT: The nature of perceptual and memory processes is examined in the light of suggested complementarity between introspective and empirical traditions. The introspective material analyzed here is that found in the Buddhist Abhidhamma literature of the Pali canon on the sta ges of perception. Possible psychological and neurophysiological correspondences to these stages are proposed. The model of perception advanced here emphasizes 2 phases. The first involves sensory analysis and related memory readout. It is postulated that this phase is completed when coherence in oscillatory neuronal patterns indicates a "match" between sensory input and memory readout. The second phase results in consciousness of the object, which comes about when a connection is effectedbetween the repr esentation of the input as generated in phase one and a representation of self (or "I"). "I" is itself generated in thissecond phase in relation to the memory readout of phase one, since this readout includes relevant prior formations of "I." It issuggest ed that "I" functions in the organization of memory and recall. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Lancaster, Brian L.
AFFILIATION: Liverpool John Moores U, School of Human Sciences, Liverpool, England UK
PUBLICATION: Journal of Consciousness Studies
ISSUE: 1997 Vol 4(2) 122-142.

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TITLE: Habit, health and happiness.

ABSTRACT: The notion of habit figures prominently in theories of health-related behavior and in efforts to encourage people to develop consistency and regularity in the healthful behavior of daily life. The consensus definition of habit as automatic and mindless behavior, however, presents three logical and philosophical problems. First, this definition of habit is at odds with the way most of our theories of health behavior try to employ the notion. Second, the behaviors of concern to most health, exercise, and sport psychologists are not the kinds of behaviors to which this definition of habit applies eas ily, if at all. Third, the kind of mindless behavior suggested by this definition may be conducive to enhancing physical health and athletic performance, but it may be inconsistent with the essential elements of happiness or subjective well-being accordi ng to Eastern philosophies such as Taoism and Buddhism, and according to the growing research on the psychology of happiness. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Maddux, James E.
AFFILIATION: George Mason U, Dept of Ps ychology, Fairfax, VA, USA
PUBLICATION: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology
ISSUE: 1997 Dec Vol 19(4) 331-346.

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TITLE: East meets West: Parallels between Zen Buddhism and social psychology.

ABSTRACT: Exp lores connections between Zen Buddhist philosophy and social psychology in order to facilitate an enriched understanding of both disciplines. A brief overview of Buddhist thought is presented, and parallels between the disciplines are discussed through co nsideration of the 4 major aspects of Zen: attachment, thought, the self, and awareness. It is contended that a great deal of Buddhist doctrine is represented in social psychology, and that Zen philosophy offers opportunities for future psychological disc overy. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: McIntosh, William D.
AFFILIATION: Georgia Southern U, Dept of Psychology, Statesboro, GA, USA
PUBLICATION: International Journal for the Psychology of Religion
ISS UE: 1997 Vol 7(1) 37-52.

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TITLE: Self-awareness of participants in a long-term Tibetan Buddhist retreat.

ABSTRACT: Examined statements related to self-awareness of 11 male and 12 female culturally diverse self-declare d Tibetan Buddhists (23-66 yrs of age) in a 4-yr Tibetan Buddhist retreat. The isolating, ascetic nature of the retreat increased over the years. The focus of the study was to assess the impact of the structured 6-mo period of strict isolation (SI) and sp iritual practice that occurred during the 3rd yr of the retreat. For those 6 mo, retreatants (Rs) were not allowed to talk to other people. Rs were not allowed to change their clothes, nor were they allowed to shave or wash, except for their teeth and face. Rs were also required to stay in their rooms. After the 6-mo period of silence, Rs wrote down 3 types of responses on a 2 page survey. The following 5 themes were identified through qualitative analysis: (1)happiness/satisfaction, (2) struggle leading to insight, (3) practice/meditation, (4) sense of time, and (5) goals/expectations. Rs' responses revealed that the SI appeared to enhance personal awareness for many of the Rs. While many more females than males highlighted the satisfying or fulfilling nature of the 6-mo SI without alluding to its rigor, males tended to emphasize the internal, psychological struggles and challenges that led to rewarding personal highlights. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Page, Richard C.; McAuliffe, Eilish; Weiss, James F.; Ugyan, Jigme; Wright, Lori Stowers; MacLachlan, Malcolm
AFFILIATION: U Georgia, Dept of Counseling & Human Development Services, Athens, GA, USA
PUBLICATION: Journal of Transpersonal Psychology
ISSUE: 1997 Vol 29(2) 85-98.

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TITLE: Comments in response to "The altered state: A missing link in ego state theory?".

ABSTRACT: Comments on B. Avary and B. Millhollon's (1997) article suggesting that an altered state of consciousness is a form of a functional ego state. The ways in which ego states are understood by experts on the treatment of dissociative disorders include a central state that is a source of wisdom. Meditation masters speak of fundamental mind being bri lliant and limitless, discovered after going through many distinct states. It is suggested that transactional analysts consider these understandings in their work. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Porter-Steele, Nancy
AFFILIATION:
PUBLICATION: Transactional Analysis Journal
ISSUE: 1997 Oct Vol 27(4) 298-299.

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TITLE: Buddhist teachers' experience with extreme mental states in western meditators.

ABSTRACT: In the past 35 years, Buddhism and its sophisticated meditation practices have attracted a large number of Western students, especially those in search of a psychologically oriented spirituality. Based on descriptive and qualitative research, this paper focuses on extreme mental states that can occur in emotionally fragile Western students undergoing intensive meditation and the adaptations that teachers have made to deal with these difficulties. Implications for the clinical use of meditation will also be addressed. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: VanderKooi, Lois
AFFILIATION:
PUBLICATION: Journal of Transpersonal Psychology
ISSUE: 1997 Vol 29(1) 31-46.

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TITLE: Meditation and mental health.

ABSTRACT: Meditation has contributed to mental health in India since the beginning of its civilization. It is now used along with psychotherapy in many places in the West. It should be studied by clinical psychologists in India both theoret ically and practically; the result of this work could be one of their important contributions to the emerging world psychology. The state of deep trance is a single common basis for relaxation, hypnosis, mental imagery, and meditation. The psychological m echanisms through which meditation heals the mind are studied in some detail. The indications of meditation for various psychopathological patients are suggested. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Vigne, Jacques
AFF ILIATION:
PUBLICATION: Indian Journal of Clinical Psychology
ISSUE: 1997 Mar Vol 24(1) 46-51.

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TITLE: Selected alternative training techniques in HRD.

ABSTRACT: Over the years a number of training techniq ues and procedures have been developed that are not part of the mainstream but are believed by some to have utility for organizations trying to enhance human performance. This article discusses four of these alternative techniques--subliminal self-help, m ental imagery and practice, meditation, and neurolinguistic programming--and examines the contributions of each from a scientific perspective. With the exception of mental practice, there is a paucity of data to demonstrate convincingly whether these alte rnative techniques promote or enhance individual or organizational effectiveness. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Von Bergen, C. W.; Soper, Barlow; Rosenthal, Gary T.; Wilkinson, Lamar V.
AFFILIATION: Southeaster n Oklahoma State U, Dept of Management & Marketing, Durant, OK, USA
PUBLICATION: Human Resource Development Quarterly
ISSUE: 1997 Win Vol 8(4) 281-294.

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TITLE: Final word: A rejoinder.

ABSTRACT: Responds to K. E. Watkins's (1997) comments on the C. W. Von Bergen et al (1997) discussion of alternative training techniques in human resources development. Noting Watkins's call for greater emphasis on qualitative studies, the present authors concur with the implementation of such studies as an adjunct to but not as a replacement for experimental studies. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Von Bergen, C. W.; Soper, Barlow; Rosenthal, Gary T.; Wilkinson, Lamar V.
AFFILIATION: Southeastern Oklahoma State U, Dept of Management & Marketing, Durant, OK, USA
PUBLICATION: Human Resource Development Quarterly
ISSUE: 1997 Win Vol 8(4) 301-303.

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TITLE: Invited reaction: Selected alternative training t echniques in HRD.

ABSTRACT: Comments on the C. W. Von Bergen et al (1997) discussion of alternative training techniques in human resource development. The present author compliments Von Bergen and colleagues on their demand for greater accou ntability in the area of alternative training techniques and disagrees with their emphasis on experimental studies, asserting that qualitative studies allow a more complex analysis and hold more promise for explaining the popularity of these training methods. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Watkins, Karen E.
AFFILIATION: U Georgia, Athens, GA, USA
PUBLICATION: Human Resource Development Quarterly
ISSUE: 1997 Win Vol 8(4) 295-299 .

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TITLE: The Zen connection.

ABSTRACT: Describes correspondences and similarities between the major concepts of Reality Therapy/Control Theory and Zen Buddhism. These parallels appear notably in the areas of Total Behavior, Responsibility and Choice, Modeling, Self Evaluation, the Quality World, and the emphasis on the present. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Emed, Yusuf
AFFILIATION:
PUBLICATION: Journal of R eality Therapy
ISSUE: 1996 Spr Vol 15(2) 14-17

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TITLE: Using meditative techniques in psychotherapy.

ABSTRACT: Although research evidence exists concerning the efficacy of meditation in psychotherapeutic setting s, therapists and counselors are often unfamiliar with meditative techniques and their usefulness. Those in professional fields frequently lack ways of bridging the gap between what may represent the spiritual domain of life and the more pragmatic concern s typically presented by clients. This article presents a model that employs meditative approaches to enhance the therapy process for practitioners as well as their clients. The model is designed to provide a sequential approach to dealing with relaxation, self-awareness, inner control mechanisms, emotional felt senses, and intuition, within a nonreligious context. It is applicable to holistic and experiential perspectives on the process of psychotherapy. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Kelly, Gary F.
AFFILIATION: Clarkson U, Potsdam, NY, USA
PUBLICATION: Journal of Humanistic Psychology
ISSUE: 1996 Sum Vol 36(3) 49-66.

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ABSTRACT: Examined differential patter ns of interrelationships between meditators and nonmeditators on issues pertaining to psychosocial adaptation, specifically, psychological distress, gender stereotyping, and dogmatism. 23 female and 9 male meditators and 24 female and 9 male nonmeditators completed the SCL-90--R, the Traditional Egalitarian Sex Role scale, the Short-Form Dogmatism Scale, and a demographic form. Meditators completed a questionnaire on meditative practice. Findings indicate that there are no differences between meditators a nd nonmeditators on level of psychosocial adaptation. Findings from the correlational analysis within the nonmeditator group revealed positive relationships between gender stereotyping and both dogmatism and psychological distress. Multiple regression analyses revealed similar findings. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Lepuschitz, Judith K.; Hartman, Valerie L.
AFFILIATION: U Central Oklahoma, Coll of Education, Edmond, OK, USA
PUBLICATION: Current Psychology: Developmental, Learning, Personality, Social
ISSUE: 1996 Fal Vol 15(3) 215-222.

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TITLE: The Buddhist six-worlds model of consciousness and reality.

ABSTRACT: Describes the Mahayana Buddhists' "Wheel of Flowing Together," a 6-segmented mandala and a map of consciousness, portrayed in paintings found all over Tibet, in temples and shrines. It shows the 6 worlds of existence: the heaven realm, the realm of rage and conflict, the realm of animals, the hell realm, the realm of frustrated craving, and the human realm. It is possible to interpret the meaning of the 6 worlds at four levels: metaphysical/ecological interpretation, reincarnational interpretation, personality typology, and states of consciousness typology. T he meaning of each phase of the 12-fold chain of interdependent origination, which is laid out along the outer rim of the Wheel, is summarized. They include blindness/unconsciousness, karmic activity, conceptual thinking, words/images, sense perception, contact/attraction, judgment/fixation, satisfied thirst, clinging/desire, conception/becoming, birthing/creating, and dying/releasing. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Metzner, Ralph
AFFILIATION:
PUBLICATION: Journal of Transpersonal Psychology
ISSUE: 1996 Vol 28(2) 155-166


TITLE: Indian system of psychotherapy.

ABSTRACT: Discusses the system of psychotherapy in India. Indian culture assumes that the universe is lawful and that there is continuity in all living beings. The ultimate motive is beyond self-actualization seeking union with the Universal Self. Personal problems are viewed as disorders of relationships with other human beings. Collectivism, interdependence, and shared responsibility are guiding forces. The goal of Indian psychology is well being from a holistic (physical, mental, social, and spiritual) perspective. The self is viewed as a major concept, and is used to bring out behavior change. Constructs such as self-efficacy, self-consciousness, and self-control are gaining currency in India. Meditation, yoga, and the Atharva Vedic self-control procedures of suggestion are some of the techniques used in treatment. These techniques are discussed in detail including their application to specific situations (e.g., suicide prevention). ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Rangaswami, K.
AFFILIATION: Inst of Mental Health, Madras, India
PUBLICATION: Indian Journal of Clinical Psychology
ISSUE: 1996 Mar Vol 23(1) 62-75.

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TITLE: "Bartlett's way" and social representations: The case of Zen transmitted across cultures.

ABSTRACT: Examines F. C. Bartlett's theory of social conventionalism both theoretically and empirically with a view to facilitating the advancement of S. Moscovici's theory of social representations. The value of Bartlett's theory for the elaboration of social representatio ns theory is demonstrated by exploring in particular its concrete utility in sociogenetic analysis of representation involving comparative studies both cross-cultural and cross-time. Some of the other features of Bartlett's theory are also discussed, incl uding its potential for advancing representations research in general through cross-fertilization with variations of embodied representations theories which have recently been put forward. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Saito, Akiko
AFFILIATION: U Cambridge, Faculty of Social & Political Sciences, Cambridge, England
PUBLICATION: Japanese Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
ISSUE: 1996 Mar Vol 35(3) 263-277

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TITLE: Recent trends in clinical psychological intervention (methods based on other than behaviour therapy).

ABSTRACT: Clinical psychologists use a number of techniques to alleviate human suffering in patients with psychological-behaviour disorders. These methods include use of behaviour therapy--in isolation or in combination with other methods in a particular case. In this paper, however, an attempt is made to cover methods other than behaviour therapy that clinical psychologists frequently employ, particularly in our country. These include, Vipassana, Transcendental Meditation, Family Therapy, Group Therapy, Crisis intervention, Projective Psychotherapy, Religious Psychotherapy, Leisure Time Activities, using parent s-teachers as cotherapists, etc. Recent changes in overall approach as well as in specific techniques are highlighted wherever considered necessary. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Verma, Santosh K.; Rao, A. Shekhar
AFFILIATION: Post Graduate Inst of Medical Education & Research, Dept of Psychiatry, Div of Clinical Psychology, Chandigarh, India
PUBLICATION: NIMHANS Journal
ISSUE: 1996 Oct Vol 14(4) 307-314.

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TITLE: Reflection and presence: The dialectic of self-knowledge.

ABSTRACT: Discusses reflective methods and divided and undivided consciousness. When one reflects on self, the self becomes divided into an object of reflection and an observing subject. This yields relative self-knowledge, but the individual can never be identical with the mind/body patterns he or she identifies through reflexive discernment or with the perceiver who stands back from those patterns and reflects on them. Divided consciousness can nev er yield direct knowing, self-illuminating awareness, or self-existing wisdom. There are different ways of reflecting on one's experience. Three levels of reflective method included conceptual reflection, phenomenological reflection, and reflective witnessing. In the practice of Mahamudra/Dzogchen, meditators discover nondual awareness as the focus on objects of consciousness gradually drops away, and they learn to rest in open presence. Since this resting in presence goes beyond effort, one-pointedness, and witnessing, it is called nonmeditation . In the state of nonmeditation it is no longer necessary to make a distinction between conceptual mind and pure awareness, in that all mind-states are recognized as forms of awareness and presence. Two paths to nonmeditation include spontaneous transmutation and ongoing self-liberation. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Welwood, John
AFFILIATION:
PUBLICATION: Journal of Transperso nal Psychology
ISSUE: 1996 Vol 28(2) 107-128

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ABSTRACT: Presents a model whereby meditation practices are interwoven in the process of traditional psychotherapy to facilitate healing and empower the clie nt. Initially a review of the various meditative techniques is provided, focusing on Mindfulness Meditation and Concentration Meditation. Five actual therapy cases are presented to demonstrate the diversity of treatment approaches with this model. The pap er then discusses how combining meditation practice with psychotherapy can simultaneously develop ego strengthening as well as meaningful experiences of egolessness, even for the trauma survivor. A strong therapeutic alliance as well as trust between clie nt and therapist is the cornerstone of this integrated approach. How the combined treatment of meditation with psychotherapy may decrease mental health care utilization, yet enhance the psychotherapeutic process in this era of managed care and cost contai nment, is discussed. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Urbanowski, Ferris B.; Miller, John J.
AFFILIATION: U Massachusetts Medical Ctr, Stress Reduction Program, MA, USA
PUBLICATION: Journal of Transpersonal Psychology
ISSUE: 1996 Vol 28(1) 31-48.

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TITLE: Revelatory openness wedded with the clarity of unknowing: Psychoanalytic evenly suspended attention, the phenomenological attitude, and meditative awareness.

ABSTRACT: Psychoanalysis, existential phenomenology, and the great spiritual traditions are kindred disciplines devoted to discovering, exploring, and living in accordance with the depth dimensions (DDs) of existence. The DD is a metaphor for ways of being that tr anscend our usual ways, defenses, and identity, together with everything experienced thereby, including aspects of self and world still undiscovered. Appreciating the wisdom and transformative power of a living relationship with the DDs, these disciplines endeavored to create reliable ways of going beyond the habitual, defensive, and surface. To explore this special open awareness, the author offers a collaborative dialogue between psychoanalysis, phenomenology, and the world's spiritual traditions. Princ ipal witnesses include Freud, Bion, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, the buddha, Jesus, Meister Eckhart, and William Blake. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Adams, Will
AFFILIATION:
PUBLICATION: Psychoanalysis & Contemporary Thought
ISSUE: 1995 Vol 18(4) 463-494

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TITLE: Integrating contemplative psychotherapy and counseling: Combining East and West.

ABSTRACT: Outlines the tenets of contem plative psychotherapy, a discipline grounded in Eastern meditation principles, and makes suggestions for blending nontraditional techniques into counselor preparation and practice. Distinctions and parallels are made between Eastern meditation and Western psychotherapy, especially in terms of existential issues. Meditation is a technique for clearing the mind, and the goal is acceptance of all parts of self. It is suggested that Gestalt therapy can be used to combine both Eastern and Western techniques fo r clients. Contemplative techniques can also be applied to counselors so that they can recognize their own thoughts as they occur but not ruminate on them. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1995 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

A UTHOR: Halbrook, Bernadette
AFFILIATION: U New Orleans, Dept of Educational Leadership, Counseling & Foundations, LA, US
PUBLICATION: TCA Journal
ISSUE: 1995 Spr Vol 23(1) 21-27

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TITLE: Selfhood and identity in Con fucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism: Contrasts with the West.

ABSTRACT: Examines the Eastern conceptions of selfhood and identity and compares them with Western conceptions. Eastern conceptions of selfhood and identity are explored thr ough a study of 4 Asian intellectual traditions: Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism. The author explicates the core ideas of selfhood and identity in each tradition and the distinction between philosophic and religious forms of expression. The different Eastern conceptions are compared with one another and with the core of Western conceptions under 3 headings: subject-object distinction, self-other demarcation and individual identity, and centrality and sovereignty. Psychological decentering is identified as a unifying theme underlying Eastern conceptions of selfhood. The author suggests taking a beginning step toward the reconstruction of selfhood to enlarge the conception of the self and its place in society, nature, and the cosmos. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Ho, David Y. F.
AFFILIATION: U Hong Kong, Dept of Psychology, Hong Kong
PUBLICATION: Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour
ISSUE: 1995 Jun Vol 25(2) 115-134

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TITLE: Cultural considerations in the assessment and treatment of religious and spiritual problems.

ABSTRACT: Proposes a new diagnostic category to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV) Task Force entitled "Religious or Spiritual Problem" (V62.61). This designation aims to increase the accuracy of diagnostic assessments, reduce iatrogenic harm from misdiagnosis, and increase mental health professionals' respect for individual beliefs and values. Most religious problems discussed in the literature involve distress related to loss of faith, change in denominational membership or conversion to another religion, intensification of religious beliefs and practices, and jo ining or leaving a new religious movement or cult. Spiritual problems most often involve distress related to a mystical experience, near-death experience, meditation, or terminal illness. Religious or spiritual problems can coexist with mental disorders i ncluding substance dependence, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or psychotic disorders. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Lukoff, David; Lu, Francis G. ; Turner, Robert
AFFILIATION: Saybrook Inst, Dept of Psychology, San Francisco, CA, US
PUBLICATION: Psychiatric Clinics of North America
ISSUE: 1995 Sep Vol 18(3) 467-485

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TITLE: In search of the self: Zen Buddhism and psychoanalysis. Special Section: Psychoanalysis and mysticism.

ABSTRACT: Explores similarities of Zen Buddhism and self psychology regarding conceptions of the self, self-unification and disintegration, and the relation between self and object. Together, H. Kohut (1984) and P. Kapleau's (1980) views suggest that broadening of insight, consciousness, and awareness accompany the more fundamental process of actualizing the core self's ability to delve into the object and into emptiness. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1995 Am erican Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Suler, John
AFFILIATION: Rider Coll, Lawrenceville, NJ, US
PUBLICATION: Psychoanalytic Review
ISSUE: 1995 Jun Vol 82(4) 407-426

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TITLE: The Lac k of Self in Psychotherapy and Buddhism

ABSTRACT: See full article here.

AUTHOR: Loy, David R.
AFFILIATION:
PUBLICATION: The Jou rnal of Transpersonal Psychology
ISSUE: 1992 Vol 24(2) 151-180.

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TITLE: Standing Out and Standing In: The Psychology of Control in America and Japan

ABSTRACT: unavailable
*Excellent review of pertinent int rapsychic differences between Japanese and Americans, including descriptions of Morita therapy and Naikan therapy, both schools of psychotherapy common in Japan.

AUTHOR: Weisz, J.R., Rothbaum, F.M., Blackbun, T.C.
AFFILIATION: U. of N C at Chapel Hill, Tufts U., U. of NC at Chapel Hill
PUBLICATION: American Psychologist
ISSUE: 1984 Vol 39(9) 955-969.

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