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Journal Abstracts

Research Related to Psychology and Zen

* Please take note that different journals have varying levels of stringency when considering artic les for publication.
These abstracts are listed to help visitors find information that will lead to closer inspection of the studies before any convictions are made.


Physical and Stress-Reducing Effects of
Meditation, Biofeedback and Relaxation Response


TITLE: Lower lipid peroxide levels in practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation program.

ABSTRACT: Investigated the effects of stre ss reduction with the Transcendental Meditation (TM) program on serum lipid peroxide levels in 41 56-74 yr olds, 18 of whom were long-term TM practitioners (mean 16.5 yrs). 23 age-matched controls who were not practicing a formal stress-management techniq ue also participated. Venous blood samples were analyzed for lipid peroxides by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay. A dietary questionnaire was used to assess fat intake, red meat consumption, antioxidant vitamin supplementation, an d smoking. Differences between groups and subgroups were analyzed by t test, and correlations. Significantly lower serum levels of lipid peroxides were found in TM practitioners as compared with controls. No significant differences were found between grou ps on smoking, fat intake, or vitamin supplementation. TM practitioners also had lower red meat intake and lipid peroxide levels. These preliminary findings suggest that lower serum lipid peroxide levels may be associated with stress reduction using the TM technique. Prospective controlled trials are needed to confirm that this effect is due to TM practice rather than to other lifestyle factors, such as diet. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Schneider, Robert H.; Nidich, Sanford I.; Salerno, John W.; Sharma, Hari M.; Robinson, Charles E.; Nidich, Randi J.; Alexander, Charles N.
AFFILIATION: Maharishi U of Management, Ctr for Health & Aging Studies, Fairfield, IA, USA
PUBLICATION: Psychosomatic Medicine
IS SUE: 1998 Jan-Feb Vol 60(1) 38-41.

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TITLE: Effects of the Transcendental Meditation program on adaptive mechanisms: Changes in hormone levels and responses to stress after 4 months of practice.

ABSTRACT: Conducted a p rospective, random assignment study of the effects of transcendental meditation (TM) on responses to laboratory stressors by 4 hormones: cortisol, growth hormone, TSH, and testosterone. Healthy men (aged 18-32 yrs) were examined before and after 4 mo of e ither the TM technique or a stress education control condition. Results show different changes for the 2 groups for each hormone over the 4 mo. In the TM group, but not in controls, basal cortisol level and average cortisol across the stress session decre ased from pre- to posttest. Cortisol responsiveness to stressors, however, increased in the TM group compared to controls. The baselines and/or stress responsiveness for TSH and growth hormone changed in opposite directions for the groups, as did the test osterone baseline. Overall, the cortisol and testosterone results appear to support previous data suggesting that repeated practice of TM reverses effects of chronic stress. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: MacLean, Chris topher R. K.; Walton, Kenneth G.; Wenneberg, Stig R.; Levitsky, Debra K.; et al
AFFILIATION: Vaytek Inc., Fairfield, IA, USA
PUBLICATION: Psychoneuroendocrinology
ISSUE: 1997 May Vol 22(4) 277-295.

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TITLE: Electro physiological correlates of higher states of consciousness during sleep in long-term practitioners of the transcendental meditation program.

ABSTRACT: Standard ambulatory night sleep EEG of 11 long-term practitioners of transcendental medita tion reporting higher states of consciousness during sleep (the experimental group) was compared with that of 9 short-term practitioners and 11 nonpractitioners (all Ss aged 21-50 yrs). EEG tracings during Stages 3 and 4 sleep show that experimental Ss ha d theta-alpha activity simultaneously with delta activity and decreased chin EMG during deep sleep compared with short-term controls. In the 1st 3 cycles, experimental Ss had significantly greater theta2 (6-8 Hz)-alpha1 (8-10 Hz) relative power during Sta ges 3 and 4 than did the combined control groups. There was a graded difference across groups during Stages 3 and 4 in theta2-alpha1 power. Experimental Ss also had increased REM density during REM periods relative to short-term controls. ((c) 1998 APA/Ps ycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Mason, Lynne I.; Alexander, C. N.; Travis, F. T.; Marsh, G.; Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Gackenbach, J.; Mason, D. C.; Rainforth, M.; Walton, K. G.
AFFILIATION: Maharishi U of Management, Dept of Psycholog y, Fairfield, IA, USA
PUBLICATION: Sleep
ISSUE: 1997 Feb Vol 20(2) 102-110.

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TITLE: The effects of a stress-management program in a high security government agency.

ABSTRACT: 44 employees of a regional bran ch of a federal government agency volunteered to participate in a 3-mo stress management program. After a series of pretests, the Ss were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups: Transcendental Meditation (TM) or an education control designated "Corporate St ress Management" (CSM). After the 12-wk intervention period, and again after 3 yrs, Ss were re-administered the same test battery. The 3-mo results revealed a reduction in anxiety and depression in the TM group. The 3-yr results suggest a reduction in anx iety, depression, and improved self-concept in the TM group. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Sheppard, William D., II; Staggers, Frank J., Jr.; John, Lucille
AFFILIATION: West Oakland Health Ctr, Hypertension Res earch Clinic, Oakland, CA, USA
PUBLICATION: Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal
ISSUE: 1997 Dec Vol 10(4) 341-350.

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TITLE: Autonomic patterns during respiratory suspensions: Possible markers of Transcenden tal Consciousness.

ABSTRACT: Two experiments investigated physiological correlates of transcendental consciousness during Transcendental Meditation(R) (TM) sessions. In the 1st, experimenter-initiated bells, based on observed physiological p atterns, marked 3 phases during a TM session in 16 24.3-42.5 yr olds practiced in the TM technique. Interrater reliability between S and experimenter classification of experiences at each bell was good. During phases including transcendental consciousness experiences, skin conductance responses and heart rate deceleration occurred at the onset of respiratory suspensions or reductions in breath volume. In Exp 2, with 11 17.7-25 yr olds also experienced in TM technique, this autonomic pattern was compared w ith that during forced breath holding. Phasic autonomic activity was significantly higher at respiratory suspension onset than at breath holding onset. These easily measured markers could help focus research on the existence and characteristics of transce ndental consciousness. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Travis, Frederick; Wallace, R. Keith
AFFILIATION: Maharishi U of Management, Dept of Psychology, Fairfield, IA, USA
PUBLICATION: Psychophysiology
I SSUE: 1997 Jan Vol 34(1) 39-46.

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TITLE: Rediscovering and reapplying contingent informal meditation.

ABSTRACT: Replicated the effectiveness of contingent informal meditation (CINM) and examined its use vs single sessi on self-hypnosis for 7 psychology students who exhibited a variety of habit control problems, including: smoking, nail-biting, and thumb-sucking. In each S, a single-S multiple baseline experimental design was used. Ss were randomly assigned to either CINM or single session hypnosis treatment. Total cessation of habit was achieved for 1 CINM S for smoking and 1 CINM S for thumb-sucking. No hypnosis Ss achieved total cessation. All 4 of the CINM Ss experienced significant decreases in their habit. Results suggest that CINM meditation may be a very powerful technique in the treatment of maladaptive habits for those who complied with the instructions for use of the technique. Single session hypnosis may also be a very useful technique for habit control, but is also dependent upon compliance with instructions to use. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Tloczynski, Joseph; Malinowski, Amy; Lamorte, Robert
AFFILIATION: Bloomsburg U, Psychology Dept, PA, USA
PUBLICATION: Psychologia: An International Journal of Psychology in the Orient
ISSUE: 1997 Mar Vol 40(1) 14-21.

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TITLE: Physiological effects of chronic grief: A biofeedback treatment approach.

ABSTRACT: Clarifies the implici t links between chronic grief, psychological stress, physiological functioning, and treatment via relaxation training and biofeedback. A simple model describes how the psychological stress evoked from grief can create or exacerbate a pre- or co-existing m edical disorder. The author also discusses the emotional aspects of chronic grief. A regimen of relaxation training with biofeedback assistance and systematic desensitization is applied to the model and the emotional dimension for the treatment of both th e psychological and physical manifestations of grief. The author advises that the relaxation therapy approach should not be used as the only psychological treatment modality, but should be used in conjunction with other methods, including counseling and p sychotherapy, and psychotropic drug therapy where appropriate. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Arnette, J. Kenneth
AFFILIATION: Colorado State U, Dept of Psychology, Ft Collins, CO, US
PUBLICATION: Death Studies
ISSUE: 1996 Jan-Feb Vol 20(1) 59-72

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TITLE: A retrospective, follow-up study of biofeedback-assisted relaxation therapy in patients with posttraumatic headache.

ABSTRACT: Although biofeedback in the treatment of migraine and tension-type headache has been widely researched, there is little research examining biofeedback therapy in posttraumatic headache (PTH). In this retrospective study, 40 Ss with PTH who had received b iofeedback-assisted relaxation at our headache clinic were questioned at least 3 mo following the completion of therapy. Ss were queried about improvements in headache, increases in ability to relax and cope with pain, and overall benefits, lasting effect iveness, and continued use of biofeedback in daily life. Results indicate 53% reported at least moderate improvement in headaches; 80% reported at least moderate improvement in ability to relax and cope with pain; 93% found biofeedback helpful to some deg ree; 85% felt headache relief achieved through biofeedback had continued at least somewhat; and 95% stated they were continuing to use biofeedback skills in daily life. A correlation analysis revealed a negative relationship between response to biofeedback and increased chronicity of the disorder. In other words, the more chronic the disorder, the poorer the response to treatment. . . . (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Ham, Lesley P.; Packard, Russell C.
AFFILIATION: Headache Management & Neurology, Pensacola, FL, US
PUBLICATION: Biofeedback & Self Regulation
ISSUE: 1996 Jun Vol 21(2) 93-104

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TITLE: Topographic EEG mapping of the relaxation re sponse.

ABSTRACT : The purpose of this study was to assess the CNS effects of the relaxation response (RR) in novice Ss using a controlled, within-Ss design and topographic EEG mapping as the dependent measure. 20 Ss listened to a RR and con trol audiotape presented in a counterbalanced order while EEG was recorded from 14 scalp locations. The RR condition produced greater ( p < .0164) reductions in frontal EEG beta activity relative to the control condition. No significant differences were o bserved for any other frequency band or scalp region. These findings suggest that elicitation of the RR produces significant reductions in cortical activation in anterior brain regions in novice Ss. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Jacobs, Gregg D.; Benson, Herbert ; Friedman, Richard
AFFILIATION: Deaconess Hosp/Harvard Medical School, Mind/Body Medical Institute, Boston, MA, US
PUBLICATION: Biofeedback & Self Regulation
ISSUE: 1996 Jun Vol 21(2) 121-129

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TITLE: The influence of stress management training in HIV disease.

ABSTRACT: Used a pretest-posttest design (with a 6-wk wait-list control and a 6-mo comparison group) to compare the effectiveness of a 6-wk stress management training program with standard outpatient care for 45 men with HIV disease. The intervention consisted mostly of relaxation techniques, mental imagery, and meditation. Outcomes included stress levels, coping patterns, quality of life, psychological distress, illness-related uncertainty, and CD4+ T-lymphocyte levels. At 6 wks, intervention was associated with increases in the emotional well-being dimension of quality of life. After 6 mo, the intervention group had a relative decline in HIV-related intrusive thinking, indicating that stress management training may have buffered illness-related psychological distress over time. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: McCain, Nancy L.; Zeller, Janice M. ; Cella, David F. ; Urbanski, Pamela A. et al
AFFILIATION: Virginia Commonwealth U, School of Nursing, Dept of Adult Health Nursing, Richmond, VA, US
PUBLICATION: Nursing Research
ISSUE: 1996 Jul-Aug Vol 45(4) 246-253

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TITLE: Relaxation training and opioid inhibition of blood pressure response to stress.

ABSTRACT: The present study was designed to determine the role of endogenous opioid mechanism s in the circulatory effects of relaxation training. Opioid mechanisms were assessed by examination of the effects of opioid receptor blockade with naltrexone on acute cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stress before and after relaxation training. 32 young men with mildly elevated casual arterial pressure were recruited for placebo-controlled naltrexone stress tests and relaxation training. The results indicated that relaxation training significantly reduced the diastolic pressure response to mental arithmetic stress. Opioid receptor blockade with naltrexone antagonized the effects of relaxation training. These findings suggest that some of the physiological effects of relaxation training are mediated by augmentation of inhibitory opioid mechanisms. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: McCubbin, James A.; Wilson, John F. ; Bruehl, Stephen ; Ibarra, Paloma et al
AFFILIATION: U Kentucky, Coll of Medicine, Dept of Behavioral Scie nce, Lexington, KY, US
PUBLICATION: Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology
ISSUE: 1996 Jun Vol 64(3) 593-601

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TITLE: The influence of stress management training in HIV disease.

ABSTRACT: Used a prete st-posttest design (with a 6-wk wait-list control and a 6-mo comparison group) to compare the effectiveness of a 6-wk stress management training program with standard outpatient care for 45 men with HIV disease. The intervention consisted mostly of relaxation techniques, mental imagery, and meditation. Outcomes included stress levels, coping patterns, quality of life, psychological distress, illness-related uncertainty, and CD4+ T-lymphocyte levels. At 6 wks, intervention was associated with increases in the emotional well-being dimension of quality of life. After 6 mo, the intervention group had a relative decline in HIV-related intrusive thinking, indicating that stress management training may have buffered illness-related psychological distress over time. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: McCain, Nancy L.; Zeller, Janice M.; Cella, David F.; Urbanski, Pamela A.; et al
AFFILIATION: Virginia Commonwealth U, School of Nursing, Dept of Adult Health Nursing, Richmond, VA, USA
PUBLICATION: Nursing Research
ISSUE: 1996 Jul-Aug Vol 45(4) 246-253.

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TITLE: Evaluating the response of mild hypertensives to biofeedback-assisted relaxation using a mental stress test.

ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the long term effect of a program of biofeedback-assisted relaxation on hypertensive patients by mental stress test reactivity. Twenty mild hypertensive patients were subjected to a mental arithmetic stress test be fore- and six months after completing biofeedback-assisted relaxation therapy. The therapy consisted of 10 sessions of biofeedback assisted relaxation instruction and continuous home practice. The study group was compared to a control group. The biofeedba ck assisted relaxation treatment produced a mild improvement in blood pressure control and decreased the dose of drugs used as well as a decrease in state-anxiety ( p <0.05). The stress-induced increases in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressur e, heart rate, galvanic skin response and skin temperature were all significantly attenuated six months after completion of biofeedback-assisted relaxation treatment. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Paran, Esther; Amir, Marianne ; Yaniv, Nizan
AFFILIATION: Ben Gurion U of the Negev, Soroka Medical Ctr, Dept of Hypertension, Beersheba, Israel
PUBLICATION : Journal of Behavior Therapy & Experimental Psychiatry
ISSU E: 1996 Jun Vol 27(2) 157-167

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TITLE: Racial and gender effects on the relaxation response: Implications for the development of hypertension.

ABSTRACT: Investigated the effect of race and gender on the forehead muscle tension and finger temperature response to biofeedback-assisted relaxation training in 20 women and 25 men with normal blood pressure. Ss completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Analyses showed that diastolic blood pressure, sodium excretion, and an xiety were higher in men. Pretest temperatures of men were lower, and men increased temperatures more than women. Black women's pretest temperatures were the highest for all groups, and they were the only group to show no vasodilatory response. Although r ace impacted pretest heart rates, a positive history of hypertension did not interact with race. Neither did parental history of hypertension affect muscle tension or finger temperature change scores. Multiple regression analysis suggested a relationship between change in temperature and pretest temperature, sodium excretion and anxiety. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Roberts, Gerard; McGrady, Angele
AFFILIATION: Medical Coll of Ohio, Dept of Psychiatry, Toledo, OH, US
PUBLICATION: Biofeedback & Self Regulation
ISSUE: 1996 Mar Vol 21(1) 51-62

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TITLE: "Effect of Slowed Respiration on Cardial Parasympathetic Response to Threat."

ABSTRACT : The present study was designed to examine the effect of voluntarily slowed respiration on the cardiac parasympathetic response to a threat: the anticipation of an electric shock...Results suggest that a slowed respiration decreases the cardiac parasympathetic withdraw response to threat. The study provides a rationale for the therapeutic uses of the slowed respiration maneuver in attenuating the cardiac autonomic responses in patients with anxiety disorder.

AUTHOR: Sakakibara, M.; Hayano, J.
AFFILIATION: Div of Clinical Psy, Tokai Central Hospital, Kakamigahara City, Japan
PUBLICATION: Psychosomatic Medicine
ISSUE: 1996 Vol 58 32-27.

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TITLE: Relaxation: Mapping an uncharted world.

ABSTRACT: Investigated factors related to relaxation with 940 practitioners of massage, abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), yoga stretching, breathing, imagery, and meditation, who described their technique experiences. 10 relaxation categori es were found: Joyful Affects and Appraisals, Distant, Calm, Aware, Prayerful, Accepted, Untroubled, Limp, Silent, and Mystery. The relaxation response and cognitive/somatic specificity models predict Calm and Limp. PMR and massage are associated with Dis tant and Limp; yoga stretching, breathing, and meditation with Aware; meditation with Prayerful, and all techniques except PMR with Joyful. Results are consistent with cognitive-behavioral relaxation theory and have implications for relaxation theory, tre atment, training, assessment, and research. A revised model of relaxation is presented with 3 global dimensions: tension-relief passive disengagement, and passive engagement. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserv ed)

AUTHOR: Smith, Jonathan C.; Amutio, Alberto ; Anderson, John P. ; Aria, Leslie A.
AFFILIATION: Roosevelt U, School of Psychology & Stress Inst, Chicago, IL, US
PUBLICATION: Biofeedback & Self Regulation
ISSUE: 1996 Mar Vol 21(1) 63-90

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TITLE: Patterns of change during cognitive behavioral treatment for panic disorder.

ABSTRACT: Examined the patterns of change in the features of panic and anxiety during cognitive behavioral treatm ent for panic disorder by comparing the efficacy of cognitive therapy (CT) and relaxation training (RT), both administered without exposure-based treatments of any kind. 36 panic disorder patients completed either 10 wks of CT or RT. Weekly measures of pa nic frequency, state and trait anxiety, and associated fears were obtained, and examined using both multivariate techniques (which conceptualize change as incremental) and analysis of response slopes (where change is conceptualized as continuous). Results indicated that during the 1st half of treatment, RT led to greater reductions in state and trait anxiety and agoraphobic fear. During the 2nd half, CT produced faster reductions in state anxiety and agoraphobic fears. Over the entire treatment course CT conferred an advantage in the rate of change in social fears. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1997 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Stanley, Melinda A.; Beck, J. Gayle ; Averill, Patricia M. ; Baldwin, Laurie E. et al < br> AFFILIATION: U Texas, Medical School, Dept of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Houston, TX, US
PUBLICATION: Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease
ISSUE: 1996 Sep Vol 184(9) 567-572

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TITLE: Regulation of mental states and biofeedback techniques: Effects on breathing pattern.

ABSTRACT: Examined whether breathing pattern may be used as a reliable index for the effectiveness of techniques applied for the regulation of mental states. Heart rate (HR), breathi ng pattern, galvanic skin response (GSR), and EMG of the frontalis muscle were measured in 39 college students during 10-min treatment with relaxation technique (autogenic training and/or music) followed by 10 min of imagery training. In the 1st 7 session s biofeedback (BFB) was not included, while during the last 6 sessions BFB was introduced and used by the Ss. Relaxation (music or autogenic training) led to a decrease in breathing frequency, attributed to lengthening of expiration time, as well as reduc ed HR, GSR, and frontalis EMG response. In most instances imagery training was related to an increase in these indices. Significant tachypnea was observed during imagery of sprint running. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, al l rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Blumenstein, Boris; Breslav, Isaac ; Bar-Eli, Michael ; Tenenbaum, Gershon et al
AFFILIATION: Wingate Inst, Ribstein Ctr for Research & Sport Medicine Sciences, Netanya, Israel
PUBLICATION: Biofeedbac k & Self Regulation
ISSUE: 1995 Jun Vol 20(2) 169-183

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TITLE: Role of relaxation in hypertension.

ABSTRACT: Compared the efficacy of 3 different relaxation techniques in reducing symptoms of hypertension. 40 mal e hypertension patients were divided among 4 groups: Broota relaxation technique (yoga exercises combined with autosuggestion), Jacobson's progressive relaxation technique (a muscle relaxation technique), Shavasana (passive relaxation with a yogic posture), and no treatment. Results from an anxiety symptom checklist, BP, and galvanic skin response measures were compared before and after the 8 days of relaxation sessions. Results show that all 3 relaxation therapies were quite effective in reducing symptom s of hypertension as compared to the control group. Shavasana was the most effective, followed by the Broota technique and then Jacobson's technique. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Broota, Aruna; Varma, Ruchi ; Singh, Archana
AFFILIATION: U Delhi, Dept of Psychology, India
PUBLICATION: Journal of the Indian Academy of Applied Psychology
ISSUE: 1995 Jan Vol 21(1) 29-36

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TITLE: "Cognitive th erapy for panic": Reply. ABSTRACT : Replies to comments by I. Marks et al (see PA, Vol 82:44602) of the D. M. Clark et al (see PA, Vol 82:25993 and 82:6378) study concerning cognitive therapy (CGT) for panic disorder. The reply addresses (1) prediction o f long-term outcome and (2) severity of agoraphobic avoidance and response to CGT. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1995 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Clark, D. M.; Salkovskis, P. M. ; Hackmann, A. ; Middleton, H.
AFFILIATION: Warneford Hosp, Dept of Psychiatry, Oxford, England
PUBLICATION: British Journal of Psychiatry
ISSUE: 1995 Apr Vol 166(4) 542-543

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TITLE: The effects of running and meditation on beta-endorphin, corticotropin-releasing hormone and cortisol in plasma, and on mood.

ABSTRACT: Examined the effects of running and meditation on beta-endorphin (beta-EP), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), cortisol, and mood change in 11 elite runners (mean age 31.3 yrs) and 12 highly trained meditators matched in age, sex, and personality. It was predicted that mood change after these activities would be similar when associated with similar hormonal change. There were significant elevations of beta-EP and CRH a fter running and of CRH after meditation, but no significant differences in CRH increases between groups. CRH was correlated with positive mood changes after running and meditation. Cortisol levels were generally high but erratic in both groups. It is con cluded that positive affect is associated with plasma CRH immunoreactivity, which itself is significantly associated with circulating beta-EP, thus supporting a role for CRH in the release of beta-EP. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychologic al Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Harte, Jane L.; Eifert, Georg H. ; Smith, Roger
AFFILIATION: James Cook U of North Queensland, School of Behavioral Sciences, Townsville, Australia
PUBLICATION: Biological Psychology
IS SUE: 1995 Jun Vol 40(3) 251-265

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TITLE: Three-year follow-up and clinical implications of a mindfulness meditation-based stress reduction intervention in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Annual Meeting of the Society of Behaviora l Medicine (1993, San Francisco, California).

ABSTRACT: Conducted a follow-up of a previous study (J. Kabat-Zinn et al; see PA, Vol 79:44179) of 22 medical outpatients with anxiety disorders who showed improvements in subjective and objectiv e symptoms of anxiety and panic following an 8-wk outpatient group stress reduction intervention based on mindfulness meditation. Three-year follow-up data were obtained and analyzed on 18 of the original 22 Ss to probe long-term effects. Repeated measures analysis showed maintenance of the gains obtained in the original study on depression and anxiety scales as well as on the number and severity of panic attacks. Ongoing compliance with the meditation practice was also demonstrated in the majority of Ss at 3 yrs. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Miller, John J.; Fletcher, Ken ; Kabat-Zinn, Jon
AFFILIATION: U Massachusetts Medical Ctr, Dept of Psychiatry, Worcester, US
PU BLICATION: General Hospital Psychiatry
ISSUE: 1995 May Vol 17(3) 192-200

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TITLE: Effects of a behavioral stress-management program on anxiety, mood, self-esteem, and t-cell count in HIV-positive men.

ABSTRACT: Exa mined effects of a behavioral stress-management program on anxiety, mood, self-esteem, and T-cell count in a group of 10 White HIV-positive men (aged 28-44 yrs) who were asymptomatic except for T-cell counts below 400. The program consisted of 20 biweekly sessions of progressive muscle relaxation and electromyograph biofeedback-assisted relaxation training, meditation, and hypnosis. Ss were randomly assigned to either a treatment group or a no-treatment control group, and the 2 groups were compared on pre- and posttreatment changes in the dependent measures. Analysis showed that compared with no-treatment Ss, treatment Ss showed significant improvement on all the dependent measures, which was maintained at a 1-mo follow-up. Since stress is known to compro mise the immune system, results suggest that stress management to reduce arousal of the nervous system and anxiety would be an appropriate component of a treatment regimen for HIV infection. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, a ll rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Taylor, Douglas N.
AFFILIATION:
PUBLICATION: Psychological Reports
ISSUE: 1995 Apr Vol 76(2) 451-457

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TITLE: A provisional model to predict blood pressure response to biofeedback-assisted relaxation.

ABSTRACT: Determined if selected psychophysiological variables could be used to identify individuals able to lower BP using biofeedback-assisted relaxation. 23 hypertensive Ss received treatment by EMG and thermal biofeedback relaxation training for 8 wks. Responders to the treatment were defined as those who experienced a 5 mm Hg or greater decrease in mean arterial pressure. Tests on responders were then used to identify 5 predictor variables: heart rate, finger temperature, forehead muscle tension, plasma renin response to furosemide, and mean arterial pressure response to furosemide. A logistic regression model derived from these provided significant predictive power for BP response to treatment. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)

AUTHOR: Weaver, Michael T.; McGrady, Angele
AFFILIATION: U Alabama, School of Nursing, Birmingham, US
PUBLICATION: Biofeedback & Self Regulation
ISSUE: 1995 Sep Vol 20(3) 229-240

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TITLE: "Effect of relaxation training on cardiac parasympathetic tone."

ABSTRACT : To examine the hypothesis that the relaxation response is associated with an increase in cardiac parasympathet ic tone, the frequency compontents of heart rate variability during relaxation training were investigated in 16 college students...our results support the initial hypothesis of this study. Enhanced cardiac parasympathetic tone may explain an important me chanism underlying the beneficial effect of the relaxation response.

AUTHOR: Sakakibara, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Hayana, J.
AFFILIATION: Dept of Psychology, Aichi Gakuin U, Japan
PUBLICATION: Psychophysiology
ISSUE: 1994 Vol 31 22 3-228

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